NEWSFLASH: Chip Cherry Update

The January, 2021 issue of the NCBG e-newsletter had an article about a fungus new to North Carolina, Leratiomyces ceres, or “Chip Cherry.” Herbarium Associate Dr. Van Cotter has gone molecular and offers this update: The ITS* sequence of our chip cherry mushroom (Leratiomyces ceres) is a perfect match to L. ceres sequences in GenBank, confirming…

The Story of the Streamhead Lobelia, Lobelia batsonii

Illustration for Feb 2021 newsletter article on Lobelia batsonii by B.A. Sorrie

Since the mid 1990s, references have been made to an undescribed lobelia in the Sandhills region of North and South Carolina. Albert B. Pittman of the South Carolina Heritage Trust was first to note that this lobelia was very similar to savanna lobelia (Lobelia glandulosa Walter) but differed in several points.

Ivey Foreman Lewis

(3 August 1882 – 16 March 1964) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium (NCU) has cataloged less than a dozen botanical specimens collected by Ivey Foreman Lewis. Most specimens were collected ca. 1901 near the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill campus while he was an undergraduate. A few were collected…

Wade Swann Neely

(28 November 1892 –  18 August 1940) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium has cataloged to date a handful of vascular plant specimens collected by Wade Swann Neely, who usually signed his specimen labels as simply “Neely” or “W. S. Neely”. He commonly collected with professors William Chambers Coker and H. R. Totten as well as…

Wade Thomas Batson, Jr.

A photograph of Wade T. Batson, Jr.

(1912-2015) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium (NCU) has cataloged about 150 vascular plant specimens collected by Batson, who usually signed his herbarium labels “W. T. Batson”.  Without doubt more specimens will be found as we continue to catalog our collections.  Most of Batson’s specimens at NCU were collected in South Carolina;…

Goodwin LeBaron Foster

A black and white portrait of Goodwin LeBaron Foster.

(4 June 1891 – March 1977) The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium (NCU) has cataloged approximately 50 vascular plant specimens collected by Goodwin LeBaron Foster, who signed his specimens and scientific papers “G.L. Foster.”  Foster was clearly keen on collecting and keen on his status as an alumnus of Dartmouth College, as…

Bruce Alexander Sorrie

Illustration for collector profile of Bruce Sorrie

b. 1944 Bruce Sorrie with Taxodium ascendens in Moore County, North Carolina in 22 November, 2011. Photo by Kathy Ann Walsh. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium (NCU) is Bruce Sorrie’s primary repository for specimens collected for the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program and for other botanical projects throughout the southeastern United…

Winter Harvest at the Carolina Community Garden

Two volunteers kneel around a bed of mustard greens in the Carolina Community Garden.

After a holiday break, masked, distanced volunteers returned to the Carolina Community Garden (CCG) last week. They cleared and prepped beds, planted spinach seedlings, uncovered and recovered row covers, and harvested 86 pounds of Chinese cabbage, turnips, radishes, mustard greens, lettuce, kale, collards, green onions, carrots, and the first beets of the season. That produce…

Open Studio Continues Despite Pandemic

pine cone illustration by Judy Lutter

by Angelica Edwards, NCBG Communications Intern Illustration by Judy Lutter Despite the pandemic circumstances, the Botanical Art and Illustration Open Studio Coffee Hour has remained a way for local artists to critique and improve their artwork. Twice a month, artists meet over Zoom to critique their art and hold group discussions about techniques, materials, and…

2021 Wildflower of the Year

A branch of American beautyberry fruits, starting with green at the left and ripening to a deep magenta at the right.

  American beautyberry Callicarpa americana Once again, we are bending the definition of a wildflower to offer American beautyberry (Callicarpa americana) as our 2021 Wildflower of the Year. This deciduous understory shrub is native to woodlands, open forests, and disturbed areas throughout the central and southeastern United States. Beautyberry has pale green leaves along graceful…